In the second episode of our new podcast, Ethical Antidotes, we interviewed Joseph Thomas, a biologist in North Carolina, who is the largest claim winner for a False Claims Act whistleblowing case in US history (USD$33 million).

In an in depth conversation, we discussed financial incentives for whistleblowing, and career thriving after “blowing the whistle.”

The United States is unique, compared to many other regions of the world, such that they have a mechanism which provides whistleblowers a financial reward up to 30% of the recovery that the government receives after the case successfully concludes.  In Australia, the Crime Stoppers program allows whistleblowers to provide anonymous information about criminal activity to the police, with potential eligibility of a reward of up to $1000 if the information results in an arrest.  As our podcast explores, financial rewards might be an incentive for people to disclose misconduct, but the money can be put to good use such as financial support while taking time off or even starting one’s own new venture (as many whistleblowers have done).

Whistleblowing incentives don’t have to be financial – there are other ways to reward or acknowledge whistleblowers for their valuable work.

You can access the episode here!